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Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome

(MTSS; Shin Splints; Medial Distal Tibial Syndrome, MDTS; Medial Tibial Syndrome; Stress-Related Anterior Lower Leg Pain; Spike Soreness)

Definition

Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is exercise-related pain in the shins. It may be caused by an irritation of the tendons and muscles near the shin bones. MTSS is commonly known as shin splints. This injury is most often seen among runners.
Muscle and Bones of Lower Leg
lower leg compartment
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MTSS is a treatable condition. Contact your doctor if you think you may have MTSS.

Causes

The exact cause is unknown. MTSS is called an overuse injury. It most commonly occurs from repetitive motion or stress at the shins. Causes may include:

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase your chance of MTSS include:

Symptoms

MTSS may cause:

Diagnosis

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Diagnosis can be made on this information.
You may be referred to a specialist. For example, a sports medicine physician focuses on sport injuries.

Treatment

MTSS is treated with:
Your doctor may suggest a different pair of shoes . A brace or walking boot may also be needed.

Prevention

To help reduce your chance of MTSS:

RESOURCES

Ortho Info—American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons http://www.orthoinfo.org

Sports Med—The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine http://www.sportsmed.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Orthopaedic Association http://www.coa-aco.org

Canadian Orthopaedic Foundation http://www.canorth.org

References

Conquering medial tibial stress syndrome. Podiatry Today website. Available at: http://www.podiatrytoday.com/article/5031. Accessed December 12, 2014.

Cosca DD, Navazio F. Common problems in endurance athletes. Am Fam Physician. 2007;76(2):237-244.

Craig DI. Medial tibial stress syndrome: evidence based- prevention. J Athl Train. 2008;43(3):316–318.

Running and jogging injuries. American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine website. Available at: http://www.sportsmed.org/downloads/tips/AOSSM%5FRunning%20and%20Jogging%20Injuries.pdf. Updated December 12, 2014.

Shin splints. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated November 3, 2012. Accessed December 12, 2014.

Shin splints. The Merck Manual Professional Edition website. Available at: http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/injuries%5Fpoisoning/sports%5Finjury/shin%5Fsplints.html. Updated October 2014. Accessed December 12, 2014.

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