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Wrist Fracture

(Fracture, Wrist; Broken Wrist; Scaphoid Fracture; Navicular Fracture)

Definition

A wrist fracture is a break in one or more of the bones in the wrist. The wrist is made up of the two bones in the forearm called the radius and the ulna. It also includes 8 carpal bones. The carpal bones lie between the end of the forearm bones and the bases of the fingers. The most commonly fractured carpal bone is called the scaphoid or navicular bone.
This fact sheet will focus on fractures of the carpal bones of the wrist. Wrist fractures of the radius, often called Colles' fracture, can be found on a separate sheet.
Scaphoid Fracture
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Causes

A wrist fracture is caused by trauma to the bones in the wrist. Trauma may be caused by:

Risk Factors

Factors that increase your chance of a wrist fracture include:

Symptoms

A wrist fracture may cause:

Diagnosis

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms, physical activity, and how the injury occurred. The injured area will be examined.
Imaging tests assess the bones, surrounding structures, and soft tissues. This can be done with:

Treatment

Proper treatment can prevent long-term complications or problems with your wrist. Treatment will depend on how serious the fracture is, but may include:

Initial Care

Extra support may be needed to protect, support, and keep your wrist in line while it heals. Supportive steps may include a splint or cast to immobilize the injury.
Some fractures cause pieces of bone to separate. Your doctor will need to put these pieces back into their proper place. This may be done:
  • Without surgery—you will have anesthesia to decrease pain while the doctor moves the pieces back into place
  • With surgery—pins, screws, plates, or wires may be needed to reconnect the pieces and hold them in place
Children’s bones are still growing at an area of the bone called the growth plate. If the fracture affected the growth plate, your child may need to see a specialist. Injuries to the growth plate will need to be monitored to make sure the bone can continue to grow as expected.

Medication

The following medications may be advised:
  • Over-the-counter medication to reduce inflammation and pain
  • Prescription pain medication
Check with your doctor before taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen or aspirin.
Note: Aspirin is not recommended for children or teens with a current or recent viral infection. This is because of the risk of Reye syndrome. Ask your doctor which medications are safe for your child.

Rehabilitation

You may be referred to physical therapy or rehabilitation to start range-of-motion and strengthening exercises.

Prevention

To help reduce your chance of a wrist fracture:
To help reduce falling hazards at work and home, take these steps:

RESOURCES

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine http://www.sportsmed.org

Ortho Info—American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons http://orthoinfo.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Orthopaedic Association http://www.coa-aco.org

Canadian Orthopaedic Foundation http://www.canorth.org

References

Distal radius fractures (broken wrist). Ortho Info—American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons website. Available at: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00412. Updated March 2013. Accessed September 30, 2014.

Distal radius fracture. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated September 15, 2014. Accessed September 30, 2014.

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